How to engage your MPP

Connect with your Member of Provincial Parliament to let them know why taking action to protect Ontario’s environment is important to you.

How does engaging with your MPP make an impact?

  • MPPs depend heavily on public support and listen closely to the thoughts and values of their constituents when making decisions.
  • Sending emails and making phone calls to your MPP can seem like a small gesture, but personalized communication from constituents can be really difficult to ignore.
  • Getting noticed by your MPP’s office is easier than you might think, and a few people reaching out about the same issue can be enough to catch their attention and re-think their direction.

How to talk to your MPP about protecting Ontario’s environment

Ready to call, write a letter to, or meet with your MPP? Start by looking up your MPP’s information here.

    Tips for meeting with your MPP

  • Call your MPP’s office and introduce yourself, making sure to mention you are a constituent (I am a mother, caregiver, student, community member, etc.).
  • Ask your MPP’s office when they are holding constituency hours and if you can book an appointment, or ask if they your MPP is attending local community events. Tip: Check if your MPP has a Facebook page. They may share information about events they attend.
  • During your meeting with your MPP, make a personal connection by explaining why protecting Ontario’s environment is important to you, your family, or the community. Include an example or a story.
  • If you’re part of a group who shares these views (e.g. a neighbourhood association or even a community facebook group), make this clear – there’s power in numbers!
  • Explain that you’d like to discuss how they can do more to support environmental protection in Ontario.
  • Thank them for their time, and let them know that you are going to follow up on their plans for environmental protection.

  • Tips for calling your MPP

  • Call your MPP’s office and introduce yourself, making sure to mention you are a constituent (I am a mother, caregiver, student, community member, etc.).
  • Keep in mind you may have to leave a voicemail or speak with office staff.
  • Make a personal connection by explaining why protecting Ontario’s environment is important to you, your family, or the community. Include an example or a story.
  • Explain that you’d like to discuss how they can do more to support environmental protection in Ontario.
  • If you’re part of a group who shares these views (e.g. a neighbourhood association or even a community facebook group), make this clear – there’s power in numbers!
  • Thank them for their time, and if you’ve spoken with office staff, make it clear that you want to speak directly to the MPP to hear their plans for environmental protection. Be persistent. If you don’t hear back within a couple of weeks, follow up with a call or an email.

  • Tips for writing to your MPP

    Writing to your MPP can be done by email or letter, but you’re more likely to hear back if you communicate digitally. Be firm but polite in your writing, and try using the following structure:

  • Introduce yourself, making sure to mention you are a constituent (I am a mother, caregiver, student, community member, etc.).
  • Make a personal connection by explaining why protecting Ontario’s environment is important to you, your family, or the community. Include an example or a story.
  • Explain that you’d like to discuss how they can do more to support environmental protection in Ontario.
  • If you’re part of a group who shares these views (e.g. a neighbourhood association or even a community facebook group), make this clear – there’s power in numbers!
  • Sign off, thanking them for their time.
  • Suggest a reasonable time frame for them to get back to you. Three weeks is usually enough.
  • Make sure to provide your contact information.

  • Suggested talking points about Ontario is NOT FOR SALE

    • Tell your MPP that Ontario is not for sale, and that developer and industry interests should not be prioritized over environmental protection.
    • Ontarians care deeply about the environment. According to a 2016 Nanos poll, 9 out of 10 Ontarians believe the province has a responsibility to ensure a healthy environment for all.
    • The Ontario government’s ‘Open for Business’ policy is putting our health at risk.  By dismantling critical environmental programs, the government is removing protections that ensure river floods don’t kill, drinking water stays clean, our wildlife and natural areas survive and we build a more sustainable and cleaner future.
    • Cutting environmental legislation in favor of developer expansion and industry profits benefits the very few at the cost of the very many. Effective governments don’t favour single industries, but rather try to balance different interests and think of the broader public good.